Wednesday, November 18, 2009

More insanity in the education field

Be forewarned ... If you are reading this, the educationists consider you a member of the oppressor class. And your children are being indoctrinated with this nonsense. -- Jim

Note: And here I thought it was teachers unions and sycophantic administrators who are the oppressor class.


Another book review from the Marxists over at the Teachers College of Columbia Universities (excerpted from TCRecord):

Social Class and Social Action: The Middle-Class Bias of Democratic Theory in Education
by
Aaron Schutz — 2008

Background: This article examines the emergence of the middle and working classes in America and describes key characteristics of these cultures as they manifest themselves today. It then explores the effects of social class on our conceptions of democracy.

Purpose: To help educators understand the relationship between social action strategies and social class in American society.

Conclusions: Middle-class educators tend to prefer a form of “discursive democracy” that focuses on the enhancement of individuality within group activity. In contrast, working-class people are more likely to embrace a strategy of collective action that I call “democratic solidarity,” which responds to the limited resources and cultural practices specific to working-class life.

Recommendations: Educators who seek to support working-class students in their efforts to resist oppression must better understand the limitations of our tendency to focus on discursive democracy to the exclusion of forms of democratic solidarity.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

"Conclusions: Middle-class educators tend to prefer a form of 'discursive democracy' that focuses on the enhancement of individuality within group activity. In contrast, working-class people are more likely to embrace a strategy of collective action that I call 'democratic solidarity', which responds to the limited resources and cultural practices specific to working-class life."

What I got out of reading this is:

- There is a clear bias, not only illustrated but acknowledged. There are "educators" and then the unenlightened, bourgeois "middle class" with their knee-jerk tendencies and narrow views.

- That "educators" not only consider themselves in a vaulted class (because of their 'higher calling' to serve our kids), but also believe--and rightly, historically so--that they are insulated from "the limited resources...which (the middle class) responds to"

These people are really, really crazy.

Anonymous said...

I guess there must be some differences in IQ among those with teaching degrees but when our child was becoming a mechanical engineer in a large State university she shared a room with a girl "studying" to become a school teacher. One of the strenuous courses the girl took required her to cut pictures out of magazines and paste them onto poster board. And she complained about how onerous it was.

Anonymous said...

There's an interesting piece on the affect of the feminist movement on teacher IQs in Superfreakonomics.

Education economist Caroline Hoxby comes to the same conclusion, but from other reasons in a piece she authored. She pins it on how unionization depressed teacher wages, driving out the best and brightest from education and into the private sector, resulting in lower average IQs among teachers.